Labor Day—Day 4

By on Sep 11, 2020 in Labor Day 2015 | 0 comments

Labor Day—Day 4 Colossians 3: 23, 24 “Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance. It is the Lord Christ whom you serve.” One of my favorite pastimes is reading. I read a book on the lives of three influential African-American Pastors who significantly impacted their culture. One in particular, was a pastor by the name of Lemuel Haynes (1753-1833).  Lemuel Haynes was the first African-American to pastor an all-white congregation, Hemlock Church of Torrington, Connecticut in 1785. He also pastored the Rutland West Parish. Lemuel Haynes stood out to me because of his philosophy of ministry. He believed eternity should shape our ministries. In other words, in everything that we do we should do it in view of eternity—an excellent perspective for believers to look at life....

Labor Day—Day 3

By on Sep 10, 2020 in Labor Day 2015 | 0 comments

Labor Day—Day 3 Colossians 3: 23, 24 “Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men.” As we begin today’s devotional, let us meditate on this question, “What motivates us to work well?” Many would probably narrow it down to two reasons: When we enjoy working with our boss and co-workers, and some would say, we are motivated to perform well because we are compensated fairly for our services. However, what if we did not like our boss? What if we work with people who tend to be difficult? What if we are not making as much as we would like? What motivates us to be enthusiastic about our work when it is work we begrudge? Remember, Paul was writing to a particular group who were at times not treated fairly and would be called upon to perform a task that could be belittling. However, Paul says in our devotional passage...

Labor Day—2

By on Sep 9, 2020 in Labor Day 2015 | 0 comments

Labor Day—2 Colossians 3: 23, 24 “Whatever you do, do your work heartily.”  Most people are clearly aware that work is necessary; especially if we desire to sustain our lives. For some, certain work brings out our best while other work not so much. A prevailing thought or behavior with many who resent work has been, do it with as little effort as possible and do as little as we can get away with. To the Greek community, this was literally called, “eye service.”  In other words, when the boss is looking we are working hard, however, when he looks away, the halfhearted worker produced a half-done job. Does that sound familiar? How do we worship God and cheat our employers at the same time?  What logic is used to justify such behavior? Our devotional text says, “Whatever you do, do your work heartily.” The Greek word here for heart is psuchē, psoo-khay.  This same...

Labor Day

By on Sep 8, 2020 in Labor Day 2015 | 0 comments

Labor Day Colossians 3: 23, 24 “Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance. It is the Lord Christ whom you serve.” Throughout the Old and New Testament and Graeco-Roman world, slavery provided labor for large portions of agriculture and skilled labor. Those who needed skilled workers would often secure the services of slaves rather than those who were freedmen. Many slaves had a better economic station than those who offered labor as freedmen. Today, that description sounds more like what many of us experience in the 21st century—it is called employment. Our devotional passage this week challenges us to maintain the proper attitude toward our work and establishes the level of work quality we are to deliver. We are also reminded who it is we work for. Attitude, quality...

My Traveling Companion—Day 5

By on Sep 4, 2020 in My Traveling Companion | 0 comments

My Traveling Companion—Day 5 Psalms 121 “The Lord will protect you from all evil; He will keep your soul. The Lord will guard your going out and your coming in from this time forth and forever.” As we conclude this week’s devotional series, we will meditate on a portion of the devotional text that can seem a bit confusing. Our devotional passage says, “The Lord will protect you from all evil; he will keep your soul.” Two words leave us curious: Evil and Soul. The Hebrew word for evil is, raʿ, rah; the meaning is that which causes harm, destruction or misfortune. Then there is the word for soul. The Hebrew word for soul is, nephesh, neh´-fesh; the word means a breathing creature. So, God can keep us breathing even in the midst of adversity, affliction, calamity or misfortune. How do we trust God to keep us when many of us know of others who were more...